Tamiya TA04 Evo-R

Post your full Counter-Steer setup specs here.
DDJ
CSJ Elite
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2011 9:50 pm
Drift Chassis: Tamiya TA04 Evo-R & TT01 Active
Location: Stockton

Tamiya TA04 Evo-R

Postby DDJ » Sun Apr 10, 2011 5:24 pm

This is a TA04R I rebuilt from the ground up into a front midship CS chassis that I call Evo-R
Image

Make: Tamiya
Model: TA04 Evo-R

Date: 4/10/11
Track surface: Smooth asphalt (parking lot)
Tire: Raikou D68/S45/D70
Motor & ESC: Novak GTB & Ballistic 8.5t
Servo: Futaba SS9551
TX/RX: Spektrum DX3.0/SR300
Weight: 2.58lbs (w/o battery)
Battery: Venom LiPower 5000mah 30c

***UPDATE 8/16/12***

Front

Camber: 1
Toe: 0
Caster hubs: 7 (Kyosho)
Springs: D-Like MSF
Sway-Bar: None
Shocks: Tamiya TRF
Shock Oil: Yokomo 300
Shocks angled one hole in on damper stay and one hole out on control arm

Rear

Camber: 0.5
Toe: 2
Springs: D-Like MSF
Sway-Bar: None
Shocks: Tamiya TRF
Shock Oil: Yokomo 200
Shocks angled vertical

Drive Train

CS: 61%
Gearing: F 9.95 / R 6.2
Front: 36
Centers: 14 front, 20 rear
Rear: 32
Spar: 120
Pinion: 31
Other: Front and center one ways

Here's a vid of it wearing HPI Cup Racer wheels and T-drifts

Here's another clip following the car
Last edited by DDJ on Thu Aug 16, 2012 11:42 am, edited 11 times in total.

Z-HiDE
Still Turns In
Still Turns In
Posts: 213
Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:08 am
Drift Chassis: MR4TC-SD, Cyclone TC
Location: Singapore
Contact:

Re: Tamiya TA04 Evo-R 1.65CS

Postby Z-HiDE » Sun Apr 10, 2011 7:30 pm

Any detailed shots of your chassis?
<Student On A Budget>
[HP : 83448625]~[E-Mail : [email protected]]
|Cyclone TC-S 1.78CS|Nosram 7.5R|ZTW 60A|
|MR 4TC-SD CM 1.5CS|Team Powers 10.5R|Novak XBR 120A|
|Sparrowhawk DX|MOTOR|ESC|

DDJ
CSJ Elite
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2011 9:50 pm
Drift Chassis: Tamiya TA04 Evo-R & TT01 Active
Location: Stockton

Re: Tamiya TA04 Evo-R 1.65CS

Postby DDJ » Sun Apr 10, 2011 9:24 pm

I made the main deck, rear bridge, front damper stay, bumper plate, and steering bell cranks and link out of a 3mm thick carbon fiber panel. All that's TA04 are the bulkheads, motor carrier (which was separated from the rear bulkhead), battery holder, rear carbon damper stay, and bumper. Control arms are TRF/Evo reversibles using stock TA04 hubs.
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
I first started CSing this chassis in its stock form (similar to a Sprint) with a 21t pulley I have no idea what is from and a 27t pulley from the Losi XX4. That put it at 1.65:1, which is where I've kept it all this time. My first conversion before the Evo-R was this. I called it TA04 Mk.II. All I did was move the motor in front of the battery. I had to cut the motor mount away from the rear bulkhead to do so.
Image
Image
Image
I decided to convert it again because I saw how well my bro's (J-M250) TA05 Square SP Type S was performing. It wasn't a difficult build and was a lot of fun doing.

DDJ
CSJ Elite
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2011 9:50 pm
Drift Chassis: Tamiya TA04 Evo-R & TT01 Active
Location: Stockton

Re: Tamiya TA04 Evo-R

Postby DDJ » Wed Apr 25, 2012 10:54 am

It's been a while, a bit over a year. This chassis is still running strong. I guess I made it right lol. Anyway here's current pics. Also updated first post settings (looks much better with the blue touches :lol: ).
Image
Image
Image
TRF Shocks with longer lower mounts
Image
Image
I did this because my style is throwing or weight shifting. Having a higher center of gravity makes it easier to toss it into a drift at lower speeds since it makes the chassis roll more. Also, my preloads are on the low side to lower the force put onto the tires for easier slip. It works well with my driving style and it forces me to be more gentle on my inputs since it doesn't hold itself well with the slightly lowered grip. Here's the ride height.
Image
Image
Image
It's similar to a rally car setup where they have lots of suspension travel but maintain a normal ride height. Front and rear overall travel is at least 2", a bit more in the rear. I still have yet to find a balance with this setup but it won't take long. Since it's on the soft side, it gets easily affected by even a half turn on preloads, although I don't really do half turns.

Also, I've been messing with shock angles. I used to have the shocks stood up as vertical as possible but that made it too reactive and twitchy, and it took a good amount of driving inputs to make it drift smoothly so I guess it was a good training setup. I now have the front shocks angled a bit more and the rears slightly angled. On my chassis, might not be true for yours, the more angled the shocks are the less reactive the car feels. It slows the suspension movement down a little bit, just enough so it drifts smoothly. I can feel it since I don't have to work the throttle and steering as much.

Overall, TRF shocks give an improved feel, the shocks angles smoothened out the drifts, and the suspension settings make it easier to manipulate (that's a key word to me).

DDJ
CSJ Elite
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2011 9:50 pm
Drift Chassis: Tamiya TA04 Evo-R & TT01 Active
Location: Stockton

Re: Tamiya TA04 Evo-R

Postby DDJ » Wed Jun 13, 2012 10:14 am

I decided to redo my Evo-R. I cut a new lower deck and upper bridge that ties the chassis together much better.
Image
Image
Image
Image
I tested it already, although it was quite windy. It's so much better now since there's less flex in the rear and there's a bit more slide too which is what it was lacking previously. The suspension and handling translate better and is much more manipulative. It's about .028 lbs heavier since a bit more material was added. Overall, it's how it should've been in the first place. The benefits of having a custom-made chassis is I can change it up however I want :twisted:

DDJ
CSJ Elite
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2011 9:50 pm
Drift Chassis: Tamiya TA04 Evo-R & TT01 Active
Location: Stockton

Re: Tamiya TA04 Evo-R

Postby DDJ » Thu Aug 16, 2012 11:48 am

**Settings update**

I decided to lower my CS% from 71 to 61, mainly because of the fact that I figured out how to get slide and steering angles from suspension settings alone. It's obviously easier to control at the lower %. I just had to gear it properly (spur/pinion) and set the suspension to it to maintain rotation and slide. Steering angles are the same as they were at 71%, and I can get even more with further suspension tweaks, or even adding little front lip splitters to my bodies.


Return to “Counter-Steer Full Setup”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests